Welcome to Temple Emanu-El

New in Library

  • Understanding the TalmudUnderstanding the Talmud : a modern reader's guide for study

    Boraz, Edward S., 1952-

  • KavvanaKavvana : directing the heart in Jewish prayer

    Kadish, Seth.

  • Listen and learn Hebrew [Sound recording]Listen and learn Hebrew [Sound recording]

    Mansoor, Menahem. [from old catalog]

  • Strangers to the tribeStrangers to the tribe : portraits of interfaith marriage

    Glaser, Gabrielle.

  • The chosen warsThe chosen wars : how Judaism became an American religion

    Weisman, Steven R., author.

    "The Chosen Wars tells the dramatic story of how Judaism redefined itself in America in the 18th and 19th centuries--the personalities that fought each other and shaped its evolution and, importantly, the force of the American dynamic that prevailed over an ancient religion. The struggles that led to a radical redefinition of Judaism illuminate the larger American experience. The transformation of the religion and culture of Judaism is a striking example. The story begins with the arrival of the first Jews in New Amsterdam and stretches the length of the nineteenth century as massive immigration take place and into the twentieth. First there was the practical matter of earning a living. Many immigrants traveled as peddlers from community to community where there were no kosher butchers. Doctrine was put aside. Then, determined to take their places as equals in the young nation, American Jews rejected identity as a separate nation and embraced a secular America. Judaism became an American religion. The changes did not come without argument, and Weisman tells the stories of the colorful rabbis and activists, including women, who would ultimately define American Judaism, and its divisions of Reform, Conservative and Orthodox which remain today: Rabbi Isaac Wise; Mordecai Manuel Noah; Moses Mendelssohn; Rebecca Gratz; Isaac Leeser are some of the major figures. The Chosen Wars is the important story of how Judaism enhanced America, and how America inspired Judaism"--

  • The female persuasionThe female persuasion

    Wolitzer, Meg.

    Greer Kadetsky is a shy college freshman when she meets the woman she hopes will change her life. Faith Frank, dazzlingly persuasive and elegant at sixty-three, has been a central pillar of the women's movement for decades, a figure who inspires others to influence the world. Upon hearing Faith speak for the first time, Greer- madly in love with her boyfriend, Cory, but still full of longing for an ambition that she can't quite place- feels her inner world light up. And then, astonishingly, Faith invites Greer to make something out of that sense of purpose, leading Greer down the most exciting path of her life as it winds toward and away from her meant-to-be love story with Cory and the future she'd always imagined.

  • The Talmud of RelationshipsThe Talmud of Relationships : The Jewish Community and Beyond

    Scheinerman, Rabbi Amy.

  • The Talmud of RelationshipsThe Talmud of Relationships : God, self, and family

    Scheinerman, Rabbi Amy.

  • And there was Evening and there was MorningAnd there was Evening and there was Morning

    Helfand, Harriet Coehn and Zager, Elllen KIahan.

  • Voices of the ShoahVoices of the Shoah remembrances of the Holocaust

    Audio documentary of the Holocaust as told by survivors and witnesses. Drawn from more than 180 interviews recorded between 1988 and 1998, the stories gathered her testify to the horrors of the Shoah as well as to the immeasurable strength of the human spirit.

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Popular Titles

  • This narrow spaceThis narrow space : a pediatric oncologist, his Jewish, Muslim, and Christian patients, and a hospital in Jerusalem

    Waldman, Elisha, author.

    "A memoir both bittersweet and inspiring by an American pediatric oncologist who spent seven years in Jerusalem taking care of Israeli and Palestinian children with one tragic thing in common--a diagnosis of pediatric cancer In 2007, Elisha Waldman, a New York-based pediatric oncologist and palliative-care specialist in his mid-thirties, was offered his dream job: attending physician at Jerusalem's Hadassah Medical Center. He had gone to medical school in Israel and spent time there as a teenager; now he was going to give something back to the land he loved. But in the wake of a financial crisis at the hospital that left him feeling unsure about his future, Waldman, with considerable regret, left Hadassah in 2014 and returned to America. This Narrow Space is his deeply affecting and poignant memoir of the seven years he spent taking care of children--Israeli Jews, Muslims, and Christians; Palestinian Arabs from the West Bank and Gaza--with one devastating thing in common: they had all been diagnosed with some form of pediatric cancer. Waldman's years at Hadassah were filled in equal measure with a deep sense of accomplishment, with frustration when regional politics sometimes got in the way of his patients' care, and with tension over the fine line he would have to walk when the religious traditions of some of his patients' families made it difficult for him to give these children the care he felt they deserved. Navigating the baffling Israeli bureaucracy, the ever-present threat of war, and the cultural clashes that sometimes spilled over into his clinic, Waldman learned to be content with small victories: a young patient whose disease went into remission, brokenhearted parents whose final hours with their child were made meaningful and comforting. As he sought to create both a personal and a professional life in his new home, Waldman struggled with his own questions of identity and belief, and with the intractable conflict between Israelis and Palestinians that had become a fact of his daily life. What he learned about himself, about the complex country that he was nowa part of, and about the heartbreakingly brave and endearing children he cared for--whether they were from Me'ah She'arim, Ramallah, or Gaza City--will move and challenge readers everywhere"--

  • The Tattooist of AuschwitzThe Tattooist of Auschwitz : a novel

    Morris, Heather, (Screenwriter), author.

    "In April 1942, Lale Sokolov, a Slovakian Jew, is forcibly transported to the concentration camps at Auschwitz-Birkenau. When his captors discover that he speaks several languages, he is put to work as a T├Ątowierer (the German word for tattooist), tasked with permanently marking his fellow prisoners. Imprisoned for more than two and a half years, Lale witnesses horrific atrocities and barbarism--but also incredible acts of bravery and compassion. Risking his own life, he uses his privileged position to exchange jewels and money from murdered Jews for food to keep his fellow prisoners alive. One day in July 1942, Lale, prisoner 32407, comforts a trembling young woman waiting in line to have the number 34902 tattooed onto her arm. Her name is Gita, and in that first encounter, Lale vows to somehow survive the camp and marry her"--Dust jacket flap.

  • The immortalistsThe immortalists

    Benjamin, Chloe, author.

  • The SevenThe Seven : A Family Holocaust Story

    Friedman, Ellen G.

  • Sons and soldiersSons and soldiers : the untold story of the Jews who escaped the Nazis and returned with the U.S. Army to fight Hitler

    Henderson, Bruce B., 1946-, author.

  • If all the seas were inkIf all the seas were ink : a memoir

    Kurshan, Ilana, author.

  • Off White LiesOff White Lies

    After years of living apart from her dad, Libby, an introverted yet sharp-witted teenager, is sent to live with him is Israel. Her arrival coincides with the outbreak of the second Lebanon war. Finally in a 'normal' household, Shaul and Libby begin to build their father-daughter relationship, but their false identities can't last forever, especially as Libby unleashes teenage fury at the lies permeating her life; those she must tell now, and those she's been fed since childhood. Official Selection - Berlin Int'l Film Festival.

  • The Zigzag KidThe Zigzag Kid

  • The Koren Pirkei AvotThe Koren Pirkei Avot

    Sacks, Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks, trans.

  • Anti-JudaismAnti-Judaism : the Western tradition

    Nirenberg, David, 1964-

    "This incisive history upends the complacency that confines anti-Judaism to the ideological extremes in the Western tradition. With deep learning and elegance, David Nirenberg shows how foundational anti-Judaism is to the history of the West"--Amazon.

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