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  • Holding FastHolding Fast

    Creditor, Rabbi Menachem Creditor, Ed.

  • Catch-67Catch-67 : the left, the right, and the legacy of the Six-Day War

    Goodman, Micah, author.

    Since the Six-Day War, Israelis have been entrenched in a national debate over whether to keep the land they conquered or to return some, if not all, of the territories to Palestinians. In a balanced and insightful analysis, Micah Goodman deftly sheds light on the ideas that have shaped Israelis' thinking on both sides of the debate, and among secular and religious Jews about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Contrary to opinions that dominate the discussion, he shows that the paradox of Israeli political discourse is that both sides are right in what they affirm--and wrong in what they deny. Although he concludes that the conflict cannot be solved, Goodman is far from a pessimist and explores how instead it can be reduced in scope and danger through limited, practical steps. Through philosophical critique and political analysis, Goodman builds a creative, compelling case for pragmatism in a dispute where a comprehensive solution seems impossible.

  • The speed of waterThe speed of water

    Wallach, Jonathan David.

  • JudasJudas

    Oz, Amos, author.

    "Winner of the International Literature Prize, the new novel by Amos Oz is his first full-length work since the best-selling A Tale of Love and Darkness. Jerusalem, 1959. Shmuel Ash, a biblical scholar, is adrift in his young life when he finds work as a caregiver for a brilliant but cantankerous old man named Gershom Wald. There is, however, a third, mysterious presence in his new home. Atalia Abarbanel, the daughter of a deceased Zionist leader, a beautiful woman in her forties, entrances young Shmuel even as she keeps him at a distance. Piece by piece, the old Jerusalem stone house, haunted by tragic history and now home to the three misfits and their intricate relationship, reveals its secrets. At once an exquisite love story and coming-of-age novel, an allegory for the state of Israel and for the biblical tale from which it draws its title, Judas is Amos Oz's most powerful novel in decades"--

  • tales of the Temple Micetales of the Temple Mice

    Garfein, Rabbi Stanley J.

  • The greatest Jewish stories ever toldThe greatest Jewish stories ever told

    Patterson, David, 1948-

  • HarpoonHarpoon : inside the covert war against terrorism's money masters

    Darshan-Leitner, Nitsana, author.

    A revelatory account of the cloak-and-dagger Israeli campaign to target the finances fueling terror organizations--an effort that became the blueprint for U.S. efforts to combat threats like ISIS and drug cartels. ISIS boasted $2.4 billion of revenue in 2015, yet for too long the global war on terror overlooked financial warfare as an offensive strategy. "Harpoon," the creation of Mossad legend Meir Dagan, directed spies, soldiers, and attorneys to disrupt and destroy money pipelines and financial institutions that paid for the bloodshed perpetrated by Hamas, Hezbollah, and other groups. Written by an attorney who worked with Harpoon and a bestselling journalist, Harpoon offers a gripping story of the Israeli-led effort, now joined by the Americans, to choke off the terrorists' oxygen supply, money, via unconventional warfare --

  • The life of Saul BellowThe life of Saul Bellow : love and strife, 1965-2005

    Leader, Zachary, author.

    "When this second volume of The Life of Saul Bellow opens, Bellow, at forty-nine, is at the pinnacle of American letters--rich, famous, critically acclaimed. The expected trajectory is one of decline: volume 1, rise; volume 2, fall. Bellow never fell, producing some of his greatest fiction (Mr. Sammler's Planet, Humboldt's Gift, all his best stories) and winning two more National Book Awards, a Pulitzer Prize, and the Nobel Prize. At eighty, he wrote his last story; at eighty-five, he wrote Ravelstein. In this volume, his life away from the desk, including his love life, is, if anything, more dramatic than in volume 1. In the public sphere, he is embroiled in controversy over foreign affairs, race, religion, education, social policy, the state of culture, and the fate of the novel. Bellow's personal life was often fraught. In the 1960s he was compulsively promiscuous (even as he inveighed against sexual liberation). The women he pursued, the ones he married and those with whom he had affairs, were intelligent, attractive, and strong-willed. At eighty-five he fathered his fourth child, a daughter, with his fifth wife. His three sons, whom he loved, could be as volatile as he was, and their relations with their father were often troubled. Few writers had greater influence in literary and intellectual circles than Bellow, who advised a host of institutes and foundations--helping those he approved of, hindering those of whom he disapproved. Although an early and outspoken supporter of civil rights, in the second half of his life he was angered by what he saw as the excesses of Black Power; he also staunchly opposed cultural relativism. In making his case, he could be cutting and rude; he could also be charming, loyal, and funny. Bellow's heroic energy and will are clear to the very end of his life. His immense achievement and its cost, to himself and others, are also clear"--Dust jacket.

  • The life of Saul BellowThe life of Saul Bellow : to fame and fortune, 1915-1964

    Leader, Zachary, author.

    "Based on much heretofore unavailable archival material and access to close relations, and extraordinary for the diligence of its scholarship, the unsparingness of its scope, and the engaging clarity of its prose, this booktraces not only Bellow's rise to literary eminence--from the roots of his family in St. Petersburg, Russia, to his birth and childhood in Quebec to his years in Chicago and at the University of Chicago, to right before the breakout commercial success of his novel Herzog in 1964--but also Bellow's life away from the desk, which was rich with incident. In the mornings he wrote; in the afternoons, he went out and got into trouble. Often this trouble involved women--spirited, intelligent, beautiful women. And more: throughout we are given fresh and fulsome readings of Bellow's work, from his early writings and debut novel Dangling Man to Herzog"--

  • Discovering Second Temple literatureDiscovering Second Temple literature : the scriptures and stories that shaped early Judaism

    Simkovich, Malka Z., author.

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Popular Titles

  • Dear zealotsDear zealots : letters from a divided land

    Oz, Amos, author.

  • When christians were jewsWhen christians were jews : the first generation

    Fredriksen, Paula.

  • Hedy LamarrHedy Lamarr : an incredible life

    Roy, William.

  • All three StoogesAll three Stooges

    Perl, Erica S., author.

    While preparing for their bar mitzvahs, comedy-obsessed Noah and Dash find their friendship threatened by a personal tragedy.

  • The chosen warsThe chosen wars : how Judaism became an American religion

    Weisman, Steven R., author.

    "The Chosen Wars tells the dramatic story of how Judaism redefined itself in America in the 18th and 19th centuries--the personalities that fought each other and shaped its evolution and, importantly, the force of the American dynamic that prevailed over an ancient religion. The struggles that led to a radical redefinition of Judaism illuminate the larger American experience. The transformation of the religion and culture of Judaism is a striking example. The story begins with the arrival of the first Jews in New Amsterdam and stretches the length of the nineteenth century as massive immigration take place and into the twentieth. First there was the practical matter of earning a living. Many immigrants traveled as peddlers from community to community where there were no kosher butchers. Doctrine was put aside. Then, determined to take their places as equals in the young nation, American Jews rejected identity as a separate nation and embraced a secular America. Judaism became an American religion. The changes did not come without argument, and Weisman tells the stories of the colorful rabbis and activists, including women, who would ultimately define American Judaism, and its divisions of Reform, Conservative and Orthodox which remain today: Rabbi Isaac Wise; Mordecai Manuel Noah; Moses Mendelssohn; Rebecca Gratz; Isaac Leeser are some of the major figures. The Chosen Wars is the important story of how Judaism enhanced America, and how America inspired Judaism"--

  • The Right Thing to Do at the TimeThe Right Thing to Do at the Time

    Zeller, Dov.

    a romantic comedy wrestling between idealism and cynicism.

  • The collector's apprenticeThe collector's apprentice : a novel

    Shapiro, Barbara A., 1951-, author.

    "It's the summer of 1922, and nineteen-year-old Paulien Mertens finds herself in Paris--broke, disowned, and completely alone. Everyone in Belgium, including her own family, believes she stole millions in a sophisticated con game perpetrated by her then-fiancé, George Everard. To protect herself from the law and the wrath of those who lost everything, she creates a new identity, a Frenchwoman named Vivienne Gregsby, and sets out to recover her father's art collection, prove her innocence--and exact revenge on George. When the eccentric and wealthy American art collector Edwin Bradley offers Vivienne the perfect job, she is soon caught up in the Parisian world of post-Impressionists and expatriates--including Gertrude Stein and Henri Matisse, with whom Vivienne becomes romantically entwined. As she travels between Paris and Philadelphia, where Bradley is building an art museum, her life becomes even more complicated: George returns with unclear motives . . . and then Vivienne is arrested for Bradley's murder"--

  • (((Semitism)))(((Semitism))) : being Jewish in America in the age of Trump

    Weisman, Jonathan, author.

    "A short, literary, powerful contemplation on how Jews are viewed in America since the election of Donald J. Trump, and how we can move forward to fight anti-Semitism. Anti-Semitism has always been present in American culture, but with the rise of the Alt Right and an uptick of threats to Jewish communities since Trump took office, New York Times editor Jonathan Weisman has produced a book that could not be more important or timely. When Weisman was attacked on Twitter by a wave of neo-Nazis and anti-Semites, witnessing tropes such as the Jew as a leftist anarchist; as a rapacious, Wall Street profiteer; and as a money-bags financier orchestrating war for Israel, he stopped to wonder: How has the Jewish experience changed, especially under a leader like Donald Trump? In (((Semitism))), Weisman will explore the disconnect between his own sense of Jewish identity and the expectations of his detractors and supporters. He will delve into the rise of the Alt Right, their roots in older anti-Semitic organizations, the odd ancientness of their grievances--cloaked as they are in contemporary, techy hipsterism--and their aims--to spread hate in a palatable way through a political structure that has so suddenly become tolerant of their views. He will conclude with what we should do next, realizing that vicious as it is, anti-Semitism must be seen through the lens of more pressing threats. He proposes a unification of American Judaism around the defense of self and of others even more vulnerable: the undocumented immigrants, refugees, Muslim Americans, and black activists who have been directly targeted, not just by the tolerated Alt Right, but by the Trump White House itself"--

  • Waking lionsWaking lions

    Gundar-Goshen, Ayelet, 1982-, author.

  • JudasJudas

    Oz, Amos, author.

    "Winner of the International Literature Prize, the new novel by Amos Oz is his first full-length work since the best-selling A Tale of Love and Darkness. Jerusalem, 1959. Shmuel Ash, a biblical scholar, is adrift in his young life when he finds work as a caregiver for a brilliant but cantankerous old man named Gershom Wald. There is, however, a third, mysterious presence in his new home. Atalia Abarbanel, the daughter of a deceased Zionist leader, a beautiful woman in her forties, entrances young Shmuel even as she keeps him at a distance. Piece by piece, the old Jerusalem stone house, haunted by tragic history and now home to the three misfits and their intricate relationship, reveals its secrets. At once an exquisite love story and coming-of-age novel, an allegory for the state of Israel and for the biblical tale from which it draws its title, Judas is Amos Oz's most powerful novel in decades"--

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